Podcast


Our podcast explores a variety of topics from our issues with special guests and contributors. We hope you will listen here or on our Soundcloud page.

In “What Every College Student Should Know about Phillis Wheatley,” our Digital Media Editor Abigail Eplin sits down with Cassander Smith, Tara Bynum, and Brigitte Fielder, the three guest editors behind our special issue “Dear Sister: Phillis Wheatley’s Futures.” If you’ve been looking for a great introduction to Wheatley for yourself or your classroom, join us as we discuss Wheatley’s life, work, and legacy.

In this episode, Drs. Sarah Rivett and Chi-ming Yang discuss their creative process of writing the “Inventions” dialogue piece featured in 56.2, “The Raven and the Bobolink.” Interviewed by Digital Media Editor Aileen Tierney.

The Early American Literature podcast series is a collaborative production of editor Marion Rust and the journal’s undergraduate Digital Media Assistants. This collaboration showcases the leadership, innovation, and insight of our youngest scholars. EAL would like to thank Digital Media Editor Aileen Tierney, University of Kentucky, for creating this episode.

The information contained in the EAL podcast represents views of featured guests, and does not necessarily represent the views of EAL’s staff or EAL as a whole.

In this episode, Dr. Lisa Blee and Dr. Jean O’Brien discuss their fieldwork around the Massasoit statue in Plymouth, Massachusetts and how it related to their article in 56.1, “Decentering 1620.” Interivewed by Digital Media Assistant Aileen Tierney.

The Early American Literature podcast series is a collaborative production of editor Marion Rust and the journal’s undergraduate Digital Media Assistants. This collaboration showcases the leadership, innovation, and insight of our youngest scholars. EAL would like to thank Digital Media Assistant Aileen Tierney, University of Kentucky, for creating this episode.

The information contained in the EAL podcast represents views of featured guests, and does not necessarily represent the views of EAL‘s staff or EAL as a whole.

In this episode, Dr. Angela Calcaterra discusses her review essay, “Indigenous Humanity and Early American Archives,” featured in issue 55.3. Interviewed by Digital Media Assistant Aileen Tierney.

Founded in 1965, Early American Literature is the official journal of both the Society of Early Americanists and the MLA’s Forum on Early American Literature. EAL’s province is American literature through the early national period (about 1830.) Along with the standard writings in English from British America and the US, EAL invites work on Native American traditional expressions, and also the colonial literature of the Ibero-American, American Francophone, Dutch, and German American populations present at America’s conception as a nation.
Early American Literature welcomes subscriptions from scholars and critics in the fields of early American history and culture, as well as specialists in early American literature.
In this episode, Sarah Klotz discusses her work “Pictograph as Epitaph: Reading Algonquian Pictography in the Removal Period” which appears this issue. She examines the impacts of Constantine Rafinesque’s invention of the Walam Olum, of Catharine Sedgwick’s fictionalization of the Pequot War, and of Mount Hope Rock on negotiations of territorial sovereignty in the 1830s. Marie Taylor, another contributor to this issue, discusses her work “The Sachem and the Minister: Questions, Answers, and Genre Formation in the New England Missionary Project.” She considers how the relationship between Puritan minister John Eliot and Massachusett sachem Cutshamekin, the post-sermon question and answer sessions, and the concept of Manitou all maintained an active discursive collaboration between Indigenous people and English settlers.

In this episode, guest editor and contributor Michael Boyden discusses the theme of 54.3’s special issue on a New Natural History. He also demonstrates the link between salt and slavery in Crèvecœur’s writings and considers the trope of blindness. Juliane Braun, another contributor to the special issue, explores the effects of motivated mistranslation on slavery and the transplantation of the breadfruit tree. Inventions contributor Paul Lindholdt discusses hurricanes, Hamilton, and the climate crisis.

In this episode, DaMaris Hill talks about her prose poem “Formed>in,” that explores her place in Kentucky and confronts the weight of history that the land bears witness to and Ana Schwartz discusses her interest in “selective fellow feeling” as it relates to how the early Puritan settlers conceived of their own place in early America, especially in relation to their neighbors, both indigenous and settler.

In this episode editorial assistant Nate Cortas talks with editor Marion Rust about EAL’s vision for the podcast and interviews several contributors to volume 53, issue 3. Annette Kolodny discusses her life’s work in the field, Anna Mae Duane shares her thoughts on Trump and Early American Scholarship, and Chelsea Stieber talks about recent scholarship in Haitian Studies.